The Civil War in Acadiana

It is 1860, and Abraham Lincoln was Just elected, the first Republican to win the White House. The Southern States had threatened secession if the Republicans won, and by the time Lincoln was inaugurated on March 4, 1861, seven states had left the union. [1]

South Carolina, Mississippi, Georgia, and Texas formally declared that the threat to Slaveholders' rights was the cause of their departure, and Georgia cited unfair general Northern economic policy toward the southern states. Louisiana seceded without giving cause.

The country was divided, with family and friends caught in the middle. It had become a powder keg waiting for something to light its fuse. On April 12, 1861[2], that fuse was lit as Union ships attempted to resupply Fort Sumter, and South Carolina artillery pounded the redoubt. Others say a battery on Morris Island manned by Citadel Academy cadets fired what is considered to be the first shots of the American Civil War 0n January 9, 1861, preventing the U.S. steamer Star of the West from reaching Fort Sumter with troops and supplies. No matter the date, the country was plunged into war with brother against brother, leaving scars that still have not healed to this day. The media of the day reported the great battle in Gettysburg, Manassas or as some called it Bull run, and little was written about the campaigns in Louisiana.

Along the highways of Louisiana are footnotes, small markers of events of that war. They tell a story about battles won and lost, tales of heroism and courage. Times are as much a part of Louisiana today as they were back then. These Stories of this great state are not just for the historian. It is our history, where we came from, where we are, and perhaps a glimpse of where we are going. So come, walk with me on tour on those five years that changed a country, Louisiana and Acadiana. Meet Soldiers like Private Seagle and General Richard Taylor. Learn about General Mouton, how Carencro got its name, and Admiral Farragut "Damned the torpedos." Fame. Visit the places they fought and where they rest, the same streets we walk today. Sit awhile by the vermillion river or bayou, close your eyes and listen to the breeze. An on it, you might hear the echoes of bugles, the ring of canon fire, or catch a fleeting whiff of cordite in the air, and if you are lucky, very lucky, you catch a glimpse through the mist of men in butternut or blue who fought and fell here a hundred and sixty years ago.


[1] South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas
[2] The official start of the civil war,

Battle of Bisland

1864 saw, the Union Army deep within the south. New Orleans had fallen, General Mouton and Union General Banks would face off near Calumet, Louisiana. Fort Bisland was besieged on the ground and water by Union troops and gunboats. It was the first…

Camp Pratt

The Civil War was just one year old, and volunteers were coming to the end of their enlistments. On April 16, 1862 confederacy legislature passed a conscription act to fill their ranks. White men between 18 and 35 were subject to the draft, and…

The Battle of Vermilion Bridge

It is 1860, and Abraham Lincoln was Just elected, the first Republican to win the White House. The Southern States had threatened secession if the Republicans won, and by the time Lincoln was inaugurated on March 4, 1861, seven states had left the…

The Battle of Buzzard's Prairie

The battle of Buzzards Prairie and the Battle of Bayou Bourbeux were fought close to the Chretien Plantation in the vicinity of Vermilionville for over six months. General Green and General Taylor have already fought in Bisbland, Franklin, and twice…